Manayunk Bridge Trail Construction Photos

Featured Image Credit: connectthecircuit.org

The Philadelphia region is gradually building a network of multi-use trails.  Included is the rehabilitation and reuse of a massive concrete bridge built by the Pennsylvania Railroad early last century.

Used until the 1980’s by SEPTA, the Manayunk Bridge – an historic landmark – will soon carry pedestrians and bicyclists between Lower Marion Township and the popular Philadelphia hillside-canal neighborhood of Manayunk.

On May 19th Trevor Booz of the Philadelphia Streets Department led a tour of the construction site (my photos are below).  The Philadelphia Young Member Forum of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) organized the event.

(Side note: After bike-sprinting on the Schuylkill River Trail back to Center City from the happy hour following the tour, I cast my vote in the Philadelphia mayoral primary with four minutes to spare!)

After the project is complete, a trail will connect SEPTA’s Cynwyd regional rail station (via the Cynwyd Heritage Trail) to the Manayunk street grid.  Future trail construction will further connect to the Ivy Ridge regional rail station, and eventually to the Schuylkill River Trail.  (Unfortunately the project will not remedy the major Schuylkill River Trail gap from Manayunk to Wissahickon Park.)

South of River: Lower Marion Twp., North of River: Manayunk, Red Line: Manayunk Bridge, Blue Line: Gap in Schuylkill River Trail

South of River: Lower Marion Twp., North of River: Manayunk, Red Line: Manayunk Bridge, Blue Line: Gap in Schuylkill River Trail (Image Credit: Google)

Ballast-filled tub over the concrete arch spans.  Catenary lines and supports to remain.  Drainage system visible to the left.

Ballast-filled tub over the concrete arch spans. Catenary lines and supports are to remain. Drainage system and electrical conduits are visible to the left.

Railings and ballast are new as of the 1990's rehabilitation.

Railings and ballast are new as of the 1990’s rehabilitation.  Taller safety/security fencing will be installed.

Concrete arch superstructure, I-76 (Schuylkill Expressway) and Schuylkill River (looking towards Manayunk).

Open-spandrel concrete arch superstructure, I-76 (Schuylkill Expressway) and Schuylkill River (looking towards Manayunk).

NAME??? showing pieces of the concrete-embedded gutter.  (Contaminated ballast has been removed in the section over the steel girder spans.)

Mr. Booz showing pieces of the concrete-embedded galvanized steel gutter. Contaminated ballast has been removed in this section over the plate girder spans.

Underside of riveted steel girders supporting the Lower Marion approach.

Underside of riveted steel plate girders supporting the Lower Marion approach.  

Future connection point to the Cynwyd Heritage Trail.

Future connection to the Cynwyd Heritage Trail.

Manayunk and the Schuylkill Canal as viewed from the bridge.

Manayunk, the Schuylkill Canal…and a parking lot…viewed from the bridge.

Car dependency is anti-democratic.  Proof? Traffic would have prevented me from making it to the polling place, had biking on the Schuylkill River Trail not been an option.

Car dependency is anti-democratic. Proof? Traffic would have prevented me from making it to the polling place in time, had biking on the Schuylkill River Trail (boardwalk below) not been an option.

I digress.

Thank you to the City of Philadelphia Streets Department, ASCE Young Member Forum, and the project partners (listed below) for the opportunity to highlight an instance of Rebuilding the Rust Belt for a human-powered future.

Major project partners: PennDOT, SEPTA, the City of Philadelphia, Montgomery County, the Manayunk Development Corp., the William Penn Foundation, the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia, and the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission, and the Pennsylvania Community Transportation Initiative.

One thought on “Manayunk Bridge Trail Construction Photos

  1. Pingback: Manayunk Bridge Trail Construction Photos | Rebuilding The Rust Belt | Lower Merion Community Network

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s